What is SSL (the "little padlock")?

SSL ("Secured Socket Layer") is a protocol used to encrypt the communication between the user's browser and the web server. When SSL is active, a "little padlock" appears on the user's browser, usually in the status line at the bottom (at the top for Mac / Safari users.)

This assures the user that sensitive data (such as credit card numbers) can not be viewed by anyone "sniffing" the network connection (which is an increasing risk as more people use wireless networking).

Common web site owner questions about SSL:

How do I get the little padlock on my site?

To get the little padlock, your site must have an SSL Certificate from a Certificate Authority. Once an SSL Certificate has been purchased and installed, it provides three things:

  1. The ability to show a page in "Secure Mode", which encrypts the traffic between the browser and the server, as indicated by the "little padlock" on the user's browser.
  2. A guarantee by the issuing Certificate Authority that the domain name the certificate was issued for is indeed owned by the specific company or individual named in the certificate (visible if the user clicks on the little padlock).
  3. An assurance that the domain name the certificate was issued for is the domain name the user's browser is now on.

Once obtained, the certificate must be installed on the web server by your web host. Since your web host also has to generate an initial cypher key to obtain the certificate, very often they will offer to handle the process of obtaining the certificate for you.

My web host has a "shared certificate" that I can use. Should I?

It's still fairly common for small sites to use a shared certificate from the host. In this circumstance, when a page needs to be shown in secured mode, the user is actually sent to a domain owned by the web host, and then back to the originating domain afterwards.

A few years ago, when SSL Certificates were quite expensive (around $ 400 per year), this was real attractive for new sites just getting their feet wet in e-commerce. Today, with a number of perfectly functional SSL certificates available for under $ 100 (exclusive of installation, etc.), it is a lot less attractive. Since your user can look at the address line of his or her web browser and see that the site asking for the credit card number is not the site he or she thought they were on, the cost savings is probably not worth the risk of scaring off A sale.

What's the difference between the expensive SSL Certificates and the inexpensive ones?

Typically, mostly price. Some expensive certificates have specific functions, such as securing a number of different subdomains simultaneously (a "wildcard" certificate), but the effective differences between basic single site certificates are very slight, despite the wide range of prices:

The encryption mechanism used by all of them is the same, and most use the same key length (which is an indicator of the strength of the encryption) common to most browsers (128 bit).

Some of them ("chained root" certificates) are slightly more of a pain for your web host to install than others ("single root" certificates), but this is pretty much invisible to the site owner.

The amount of actual checking on the ownership of the domain varies wildly among sellers, with some (usually the more expensive) wanting significant documentation (like a D & B number), and others handling it with an automated phone call ("press # 123 if you 'Ve just ordered a certificate ").

Some of them offer massive monetary guarantees as to their security (we'll pay you oodles of dollars if someone cracks this code), but since it's all the same encryption mechanism, if someone comes up with a crack, all e-commerce sites will Be scrambling, and the odds of that vendor actually having enough cash to pay all of its customers their oodel is probably slim.

The fact is that you are buying the certificate to insure the safety of the user's data, and to make the user confident that his or her data is secure. For the vast majority of users, simply having the little padlock show up is all they are looking for. There are exceptions (I have a client in the bank software business, and they feel that their customers (bank officers) are looking for a specific premier name on the SSL certificate, so are happy to continue using the expensive one), but most e -commerce customers do not pick their sellers based on who issued their SSL Certificates.

My advice is to buy the cheaper one.

I have an SSL certificate – why should not I serve all my pages in "Secured" mode?

Because SSL has an overhead – more data is sent with a page that is encrypted than a page that is not. This translates to your site appearing to run slower, particularly for users who are on dial-up or other slow connections. Since this also increases the total amount of data transferred by your site, if your web host charges by transfer volume (or has an overage fee, as most do), this can increase the size of your monthly hosting bill.

The server should go into secure mode when asking a user for financial or other sensitive data (which may well be "name, address and phone number", with today's risk of identity theft), and operate in normal mode otherwise.

It's The Law

Billboards tell us to wear our seat belts because it's the law. I envision a day when prominent signs and ads say: "Your thoughts create your life," and "Like attractions like." We would have constant reminders of the Law of Cause and Effect everywhere we go. Actually, we do have constant reminders of this law wherever we go. In his classic book, The Science of Mind, Ernest Holmes says: "Everyone joins to himself just what he is, and we may set it down that where we are, however intolerable the situation may be, we are just where we belong." I may add that however joyous a situation may be could also be just where we belong.

Charles Fillmore said in his book: Prosperity, "All true action is governed by law. Nothing just happens. There are no miracles. There is no such thing as luck. Nothing comes by chance. Explained under the law of cause and effect. " A Course In Miracles says: "Everything you see is the result of your thoughts. There is no exception to this fact." The Bible tells us that we will reap whatever we sow.

Most of us understand this law academically. The difficulty is in living it consciously. It is a law that you can not break. It is working whether or not you believe in it. You are reaping what you are sowing. Your thoughts, assumptions, beliefs, attitudes and feelings are mirrored back to you in your experiences of life. Why is it that we can pray, affirm, and think positive thoughts and still not experience changes in life that we desire?

The love of God continuously flows through us without our asking. When our thoughts and emotions are in tune with this Divine vibration, we experience joy, peace, and a sense of well being. When we are appreciating, loving, and creating harmony we are in the flow of Divine energy. When we look upon our world critically, fearfully, angrily, or with disappointment we are cutting off the flow. We label something as bad and our being begin to vibrate at the same frequency. I worry about not having enough money and my life experience becomes as one great magnetic field appealing to myself more money problems.

In Science, fields are invisible structures that occupy space and exert influence within that space. My thought forms occupation space creating a field around me. My thought and emotion create energy. My energy flows inward and outward. It flows inward, coloring my interpretation of people and events. It flows outward, looking for that which is in harmony with it, drawing it to me.

We do not merely respond to the stimuli around us; We create the stimuli. I decide what I am seeing, hearing and feeling. Your words to me are an attack, a call for help, or nothing at all depending on the choice I make. This is how my energy flows inward, influencing my responses at the mental, emotional, and physical levels.

Energy flows outward affecting external events. Years ago I was struggling to increase my consulting business. I was having trouble finding new clients. At the same time, I was spending time and energy looking for a full time job. I was afraid that my consulting practice would not increase. I was stuck, unable to increase business and unable to get a job.

My energy was flowing in two opposing directions. I really did not want a job. Conflict and fear in my thinking and emotions created a field of confusion. Finally, I made a decision to stop looking for a job and to commit to my consulting practice. I focused my energy on what I really wanted. I thought about how wonderful it would be to be successfully self-employed. Within two weeks I received a call from a client who offered me a large, well paying project. They happened to find a piece of paper with my name and number on it in an old file cabinet.

Fear is a focus on what is not desired. A focus on what is not desired puts us in vibrational harmony with what is not desired. We fill our field with thoughts and emotions that serve as attractors for exactly what we do not want. At the same time, the love of God is flowing to us. It is not appealing our heart's desires to us because we are cutting off the energy with our fearful thoughts and beliefs.

I may think: "Would not it be wonderful to have a successful business? Would not it be great to have more friends? Would not it feel fantastic to be more healthy? These thoughts and emotions begin to build a field for me As I lovingly hold my vision, the love of God flows into my field ever creating the desired effects. My appreciative energies serve as attractors, structuring my field of experience.

Often we follow up our loving thoughts with thoughts of doubt or fear. Old emotional tendencies kick in and take over. Let's say you want a new relationship and you create both the partnership and the loving feelings in your mind. Soon old fears take over. Your tendencies to feel lonely and to feel bad about past failures cut you off from the love you felt a few moments ago. You want to get rid of these tendencies but you have trouble letting go of the payoffs you're receiving for staying right where you are. It's safer to be alone. It's easier to not try than to fail again.

There may not be an exact formula to change our fields in order to experience greater well being. This is what I use:

1. I identify what I do not want.

2. I identify, specifically, what I do want.

3. I identify the feeling of well being that comes to mind when I think about what I want.

4. I choose which feeling I wish to create (the feeling that comes from living with what I do not want or the feeling that comes with experiencing what I do want?)

5. I make a commitment to what I want, and become what I want. If I want a loving relationship I need to become one who relates lovingly. I need to think, visualize, walk, talk, and feel as if my vision were already here.

6. I trust Spirit to deliver that which is highest and best for me. I am unattached to specific results trusting Spirit to decide.

Ultimately, the specific things and situations we desire are not what is important. It is the creation of an enhanced state of well being that matters. As we create this state we create a field of well being around us. This field influences all who intersect it, assisting them to create greater well being, too. The love of God, as true cause, flows through us, creating conditions that enhance joy. This is the only way to positively change ourselves and the world. It's the law.

The Psychology of Advertising and Marketing

When we talk about the Psychology Of Advertising, perception is paramount. Your advertisements are all about perception so you must make the most of each and every advertisement. You need to know what works and what does not so do you waste your time and money on bad copy. A series of experiments were carried out to determine whether white or black type made the more attractive display advertisements. Over 500 people were used in the experiment. The background for the white type was gray in some cases, but in most cases it was black. The results show that the ordinary reader is more likely to notice display type which is black than a display type of the same sort which is white.

Another series of laboratory experiments was made on the same subject. Particularly prepared pages were shown for one-seventh of a second. On part of the sheets black letters on white background and white letters on black background were shown. In other cases one half of the sheet had a black background, with words in white type, and the other half of the sheet had a white background with words in black type. Scores of cards were constructed in which all the possible combinations of white and black were made and shown to a number of persons for such a short space of time that no one could perceive all there was on any sheet. Under these circumstances the subjects saw what first attracted their attention and what was the easiest to perceive. The final results showed that the black letters on a white background were seen oftener than the white type on a black background. This proves true with other colors too. A dark font color on a light background is noted more often than a light font color on a dark background. Use the right combination unless you are seeking a specific "feel" for your advertisement.

It seems quite certain that, other things being equal, those advertisements will be the most often read which are printed in type which is the most easily read. The difference in the appearance of the type in many cases may be so small that even persons experienced in the choosing of type may not be able to tell which one is the more legitimate, and yet the difference in their values ​​may be great enough to make It a matter of importance to the advertiser as to which type he should use.

If the matter of the proper use of type is of importance to the advertiser, it is even more important that he should make a wise use of graphics.

The graphic is frequently used merely as a means of attracting attention, and its function as a symbolic illustration is disregarded. In a few cases this may be wise and even necessary, but when we consider the value of an graphic as a symbol, we are surprised that graphics are not used more extensively as well as more judiciously. The first form of writing was picture writing, and the most simple and direct form of graphic representation is through the picture and not through the printed word. At a single glance we can usually read about four words; That is to, say, the width of perception for printed words is about four. At a single glance at an illustration we can see as much as could be told in a whole page of printed matter. The width of perception for illustrations is very much more extensive than it is for printed forms of expression.

The illustration may perform either one or both of two functions. It may be a picture picture used to attract attention or it may be an "illustration" and a real aid to perception by assisting the text to tell the story which is to be presented. In the first case it would have been called an irrelevant painting; In the second case it is relevant. There have been several investigations carried on to determine the relative attention value of relevant and unlawful illustrations. Although the results so far, reached are not so decisive as may be desired, yet it looks certain that the attention value of relevant illustrations is greater than had been supposedly and that the irrelevant "picture" is frequently not so potent in attracting attention as a Relevant illustration would be. Under these circumstances it seems that, in general, the illustration in an advertisement should have the double function of attracting attention and assisting perception. Which one of these functions is the more important might be a profitable question for discussion, but when these two functions can be united in the same illustration, its value is enhanced twofold. Irrelevant illustrations are produced purely because they are expected to attract attention, when in reality they may attract the attention of no one except the person who designed them and of the unfortunate man who has to pay for them. There are many illustrations produced and inserted in advertisements because they are supposed to assist the perception. They are supposed to tell the story of the goods advertised and to be a form of argumentation. The designer of the illustration and one familiar with the goods knows what the picture stands for, and so for him it is a symbol of the goods and tells the story of the special advantages of the goods. To one unacquainted with the illustration and with the goods advertised, the illustration is no illustration at all. Not only that, but an illustration may distract the viewer from the actual message. Things animated graphics may actually draw the eyes away and the viewer will never get back to the actual message.

The advertiser is so familiar with what he has to offer that he can not appreciate the difficulty the public has in getting a clear and complete perception by means of his advertisements of the goods advertised. It is almost impossible to err on the side of clearness. A sketchy illustration may appear artistic to the designer, but there is danger that it will be taken as meaningless scrawls by the viewer, and so it will not receive a second thought from them. The text and the illustration should, first of all, be clear and should in every way possible assist the mind of the possible customer in forming a correct idea of ​​the goods being exploited. This is what the Psychology of Advertising is all about; Getting the viewer to remember your product and purchasing it.

Online Advertising: Remnant Traffic

What is “remnant traffic”, and why it is good for advertising?

‘Remnant traffic’ myths.
There are a multitude of myths and misconceptions concerning different aspects of online advertising which are still misleading for both Internet users and advertisers alike. One of these misconceptions is the definition of ‘remnant traffic’. Some advertising networks and agencies have their own glossary open for public use, where remnant traffic is often defined as “the most inexpensive ad inventory traffic by disreputable sites or empty ‘parked domains’ advertising inappropriate content”. Is remnant traffic really as bad as we are led to believe?

In order to understand what remnant traffic truly is let’s look more closely at what the traffic is the remnant of.

Premium traffic: The easiest way to understand is to imagine the banner of a famous brand on a top website’s homepage. In fact premium traffic is the “cream” of a website’s audience. Websites that provide premium traffic are guaranteeing to the advertiser that the audience will note the ad. They will primarily display the banner at notable places so ALL visitors to the site will see it.

This gives us our opposing definition of ‘remnant traffic’. First of all this term had been considered as the unsold inventory of our big brand advertiser above. Another stereotype is that historically remnant traffic was thought of as sold by low traffic ‘unpopular’ websites only, as they have no hope of attracting big name brands as advertisers. In the absence of alternatives these low traffic sites place banners from blind networks, which offer inexpensive ads often of doubtful content and quality.

Thus there formed a situation where premium traffic is considered as top websites traffic and remnant traffic is the traffic of the other less popular resources online. That would sound quite reasonable if it wasn’t found to be largely untrue under detailed consideration. In order to sort out the fact from the fiction let’s look at the nearest relation of online ads – advertising on TV, radio and traditional print media.

As it turns out there was already a very close definition of ‘remnant advertising’ in TV, radio and print media.

Is there ‘remnant advertising’ in the other media?
TV remnant advertising is advertising at any time except prime-time. The further from prime-time an advert is shown, the more discounts a channel offers to advertisers. Discounts on TV may reach 90% for unsold inventory. Discounts on radio are also prevalent and depend on time of broadcast and usual audience listening figures. These discounts may range from 25% to 75%.

Another rule operates for printed media as they are selling physical advertising space. Advertising space nearer the middle of the newspaper is priced vastly differently from a front page advert cost. In this case a direct comparison can be made between advertising on the front page of a newspaper with a banner on the homepage of a popular website.

The win-win nature of remnant advertising was accepted long ago in traditional media advertising and so the approach to premium and remnant ads was formed as the market matured. It is obvious and logical that those media may offer discounts up to 90% for unsold time or space. This is called remnant advertising. In this case both the channel and the advertiser are gaining. The channel covers 100% of scheduled advertising inventory; the advertiser is placing his advert with resources required with a great discount. So as we can see the place for remnant advertising was found in traditional media. Further remnant advertising is working effectively and not giving rise to the rejection of potential participants whether they be advertisers, advertising agencies or publishers.

‘Remnant traffic’ as it is.
Now let’s return to the Internet. If you look through the homepage of any top website, you will usually see only big-brand advertising in all the most notable places. Obviously this is premium traffic, somewhat analogous of prime-time on TV or magazines’ or newspapers’ front pages. If however you leave the page and return to it once or twice, the displayed advertising begins to change before your very eyes from a big brand to smaller or less well known advertisers or brands.

It turns out that as well as TV channels sell their prime-time, large websites sell impressions with a ‘first demonstration’ privilege. By refreshing a page several times we leafed through the big brand premium ad traffic and may now in fact see true ‘remnant advertising’ on a popular website. So that means top sites also have remnant traffic don’t they? Undoubtedly they do and they monetize it as well as traditional media do with their remnant advertising through great discounts. Separately it should be noted that this is the same mythical remnant traffic, which some networks and agencies associate with something inexpensive, negative and full of inappropriate content. These terms are obviously mismatched with the reality of remnant ads on top websites. On these top websites, remnant inventory may still be very expensive and high quality both for ad placement and ad content. Thus we have dispelled this particular myth.

But what should small low-traffic sites do? They do not attract huge site traffic numbers and thus cannot place premium class brand advertising. Are there any alternatives except the placement of inexpensive ad of sometimes very doubtful content, as described at the beginning of this article’s?

Can we benefit from using ‘remnant traffic’?
There are currently four main alternatives each with different pros and cons:

(a)You may place contextual advertising from one of the big search engines. Such services offer banner display advertising too. Among the advantages we should mention flexibility and adaptability of ad settings, rotations, localization etc. The disadvantages include delays with site verification and authorization to collaborate this program and delays with revenue payouts for displayed ads. Example: Google AdSense

(b)You may place a banner from one of the ‘blind’ ad networks. The principal advantages are that it is fast, simple and will generate money for anybody without exception. The disadvantages are lower revenues and the very real possibility of the appearance of inappropriate or shocking advertising content. Example: Clicksor

(c)You may register at a specialized remnant traffic ad network. These networks specialize in monetization of remnant traffic only. Both medium and high traffic sites use their services to fill their remnant ad inventory. The principal advantages are a generally high return in comparison with the alternatives and guaranteed clear and appropriate ad content. The main disadvantage is the current inability to monetize Chinese, Korean or Indian traffic sufficiently using these ad networks. Thus this alternative should be chosen in the case of sites with predominantly European or US traffic. Example: Fidelity Media

(d)You may place social (or philanthropic) advertising. The advantages are worthwhile ads, wholly appropriate content and you can improve your karma by doing social good. Disadvantage: it is generally free and thus not for profit. Example: Ad Council

Hopefully after considering these options there will be an obvious conclusion so do not hesitate to experiment. Earn money from your website and don’t get fooled by pseudo-authoritative statements that your traffic is worthless to advertisers. In most cases it is simply not true.